Teaching

In teaching, Carrie’s classes focus on the mathematical and computational language for today’s questions in key social justice issues, with an emphasis on STEM education, environmental sustainability, and public health. She has a passion for teaching interdisciplinary mathematics and mathematics pedagogy (teaching best practices).  To have a solid foundation in understanding your field, our future leaders need to have model and computational literacy.

Carrie Diaz Eaton in DCS 303: Discrete Structures and Modeling, Fall 2018 at Bates College.
Photo credit: Phyllis Graber Jensen.

Upcoming courses – Winter 2020

DCS 30x – Network Analysis (co-taught by Hanson Shrout and Diaz Eaton)

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course will engage students in data cleaning, visualization and other tasks using the open source (free) programming language R. Prior programming experience is expected. This can be through a DCS course such as Data Cultures or Calling Bull or through a course in another department that uses R, such as Political Statistics. If you do not have prior R experience, having enough programming experience in other languages so that you understand the basics of a new language is important.
As an “Integrated Core” DCS course, students interested in the philosophy of DCS courses will find this course to be balanced in both examination of digital-social issues alongside the introduction of programming to further explore such issues with agency.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: Students who are interested in programming in real-life application areas which confront social justice, racism, and equity are encouraged to sign-up for this course. Students who have also declared the DCS GEC may use this course to meet an upper level DCS requirement. 

Q : Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: This course will be project based, will require group work, heavy reading, handling real data, and will engage students in real-world issues with open-ended questions and goals. This is the first time this course will be offered. As such the prerequisites will be set as “instructor permission.” Students eligible for permission will have 1) prior programming experience and 2) prior experience in courses which emphasize critical inquiry. Please send an inquiry to Dr. Diaz Eaton (cdeaton@bates.edu) and Dr. Hanson Shrout (ashrout@bates.edu) which speaks to your interest and prior course experience prior to registration.

DCS 105 – Calling Bull   (link to syllabus)

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course is designed as a gentle first introduction to R and data visualization. More time will be spent on data exploration and current events than the amount of time spent at a computer. As an “Integrated Core” DCS course, students interested in the philosophy of DCS courses will find this course to be balanced in both examination of digital-social issues alongside the introduction of programming to further explore such issues with agency.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: One reason to sign up is that students are looking for an introduction to R before moving into disciplinary-based statistics course. Another reason to take this course may be because students are interested in the way we visualize and communicate data to make arguments.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: This course is listed as a Q satisfying course and does not have prerequisites. It design from the course “Calling Bull,” created by a Information Theorist, Jervin West, and Biologist, Carl Bergstrom, at University of Washington. Students can look over the website, callingbull.org, for some idea of what will be in the course.

Updates since last offering: News coverage of this course can be found here: https://www.bates.edu/news/2019/03/28/the-bull-is-in-their-court/

Current courses

DCS 108 – Introduction to Computation for Science and Mathematics

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course is designed to expose students in science and math to the use of programming in those fields as it relates to numerical and visual exploration of mathematical concepts and models in science. It starts programming with visual diagramming and spreadsheets. Then we delve into recreating the same and more advanced work using a command-based programming language, Matlab/Octave.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: There are a variety of upper-level courses which delve into the use of programming while also introducing sophisticated concepts in science and/or mathematics. This course represents an alternative pathway to these courses, designed to more gently prepare students to engage. Calculus II is a pre-/co-requisite so that we can computationally explore the mathematical concepts already learned in Calculus I & II, and focus our attention instead on the use of technology to explore them and related applications. Another reason to take this course may be for students that have taken BC Calculus and want an alternative to calculus in order to complete the Quantitative Requirement.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: We will also discuss the use of computing to both advance science and mathematics and discuss how the approach to science has been changed by the advent of computing. We will also introduce key figures in early and contemporary computing. Matlab is not necessary to purchase for this course – there is a free version called Octave and both Octave and Matlab will be available for free via a web interface.

Past courses at Bates

DCS s22 – The Past, Present, and Possible Dystopian Future of Computing (link to syllabus)

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course will have no explicit programming instruction. It will be primarily focused on writing about ideas in computing.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: This course will examine in the past, present and future the following questions: “Who is doing the programming?,” “What are the uses and abuses of computing?,” and “Who has the power of computing and to what end?.” To explore this space, we will use both readings and film (as a result there is a longer slot 1 day/week for watching films in class), and then reflect our ideas through various forms of writing. This course does satisfy a writing-intensive W2 requirement.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: Writing in digital and computational spaces can take many forms. In the presenting of research involving code, we might be asked to engage in lab research reports and the act of writing code. However, in this course we are exploring the human consequences on computing technology, which might be written for public audiences or be written to have an affective effect on the reader. Therefore, in this course, we will introduce and practice the following forms: Literary Analysis, Personal Narrative, Public Informative Writing, and Creative Writing. To this end, we will be engaged in a learning community with the ARC writing tutor short term class, which will help us support peer-review processes. By the end of the course, each student will develop an ePortfolio with revised written work.

Updates since last offering: This course was is slated for odd year short terms, but may change depending on the new configuration for short term.

DCS 304 – Community Organizing for a Digital World  (link to syllabus)

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course will have very little explicit programming instruction. It will be primarily focused on design of equitable digital spaces.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: This course will discuss how online communities create social change. It will provide frameworks for organizing and encouraging online community formation and discussion. It will also provide insight into how social media and networks are a crucial part of digital organizing, and thus should be of interest to social science majors in particular. This course should also be of interest to any student interested in science, math, or social science education as well as those interested in environmental data science due to the CEL component.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: This course will be completely driven by a community-engaged learning partner project, EDSIN. Our charge will be to organize the online activity for their April conference on Inclusion and Equity in Environmental Data Science. Students can browse the website at edsin.qubeshub.org for more information and can email the instructor regarding prerequisite waivers.

Updates since last offering: The partner will change each time this course is offered, and for that reason may be slightly different in content area. This course is scheduled to be offered in odd winter semesters.

DCS 303 – Discrete Structures and Modeling  (link to syllabus)

Q: How much programming is in this course?
A: This course assumes prior programming experience, either a 2xx DCS programming course or a programming course from math or physics.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: This course will introduce students to basic structures in programming, particularly in scientific computing and data science, such as algorithmic and computational thinking, probability, logic, vectors, arrays/matrices, and graphs. Topics used to motivate the course are taken from biology, environmental science, philosophy, economics, and geek fandom.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: The majority of the class time is spent on in-class projects. Therefore, there will be significant prep assignments outside of class to prepare for project time in lieu of lecture and attendance is extremely important. 

Updates since last offering: This course is currently expected to be offered even year Fall semesters.

Visit to Carrie Diaz Eaton’s course DCS 303: Discrete Structures for Modeling, in Carnegie 339.

Previous Teaching Experience

Unity College
MA 2333 Calculus I* – Syllabus
MA 3343 Calculus II* – Syllabus
IC 2006 Summer Bridge Program
LR 1113 Elementary Algebra
LR 1123 Intermediate Algebra
MA 1223 Algebra and Trigonometry/Precalculus
MA 2243 Statistics
MA 2003 Applications in Mathematics: Populations and Probability
IS 4773 Ecological Disease Modelling
HU 1003 Spanish I w/Melora Norman
ES Project Assistant/Leader* – Modeling Ecological Disease

College of the Atlantic
Modeling Continuous Systems with Differential Equations*

University of Tennessee
Math 598, College Mathematics Pedagogy Discussion Group**
Math 598, Mentoring in Mathematics**
Math 598, GTA Teaching Development Seminar**
Math 152, Mathematics for the Life Sciences
Math 110/113, Mathematical Reasoning
Algebra I, Project GRAD

University of Maine
MAT 111, College Algebra

Jackson Labs and University of Maine Augusta at Bangor
Mathematics for laboratory assistants*

*See my work in interdisciplinary mathematics education
**see Graduate Student Teaching Professional Development Program.

Archived page from Unity College website (link)