Courses

Fall 2018

DCS 303 – Discrete Structures and Modeling link to syllabus 
Q: How much programming is in this course?
A: This course assumes prior programming exposure, either a 2xx DCS programming course or a programming course from math or physics.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: This course will introduce students to basic structures in programming, particularly in scientific computing and data science, such as algorithmic and computational thinking, probability, logic, vectors, arrays/matrices, and graphs. Topics used to motivate the course are taken from biology, environmental science, philosophy, economics, and geek fandom.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: The majority of the class time is spent on in-class projects. Therefore, there will be significant prep assignments outside of class to prepare for project time in lieu of lecture and attendance is extremely important. 

Winter 2019

DCS 105 – Calling Bull
Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course is designed as a gentle first introduction to R and data visualization. A significant amount of time will be spent on data exploration and current events, more than the amount of time spent at a computer.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: One reason to sign up is that students are looking for an introduction to R before moving into disciplinary-based statistics course. Another reason to take this course may be because students are interested in the way we visualize and communicate data to make arguments.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: This course is listed as a Q satisfying course and does not have prerequisites. It design from the course “Calling Bull,” created by a Information Theorist, Jervin West, and Biologist, Carl Bergstrom, at University of Washington. Students can look over the website, callingbull.org, for some idea of what will be in the course.

DCS 304 – Community Organizing for a Digital World

Q: What is the programming in this course?
A: This course will have very little explicit programming instruction. It will be primarily focused on design of equitable digital spaces.

Q: Why might students want to sign up for this course?
A: This course will discuss how online communities create social change. It will provide frameworks for organizing and encouraging online community formation and discussion. It will also provide insight into how social media and networks are a crucial part of digital organizing, and thus should be of interest to social science majors in particular. This course should also be of interest to any student interested in science, math, or social science education as well as those interested in environmental data science due to the CEL component.

Q: Is there anything else I should know about this course?
A: This course will be completely driven by a community-engaged learning partner project, EDSIN. Our charge will be to organize the online activity for their April conference on Inclusion and Equity in Environmental Data Science. Students can browse the website at edsin.qubeshub.org for more information and can email the instructor regarding prerequisite waivers.